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Turnip Rattle 100% organic cotton

$37.00
Type: Le Marché

Barney Turnip

This fruit and vegetable toy is an original and sustainable birth gift idea.

Unigender, this rattle is for all babies, girls and boys.

This is a Montessori inspired toy. Its texture in braided mesh stimulates the baby sensory and kinesthetic capacities. And the rattle it contains attracts its attention. 

Made with respect for the environment, it is 100% organic cotton GOTS*certified. And when we say 100% cotton, it's inside and outside. The padding is also in cotton. Zero waste, its corn fiber packaging is reusable, recyclable and compostable.

This toy is handmade by our crafts, women with fairy fingers. It’s an old fashioned toy made ethically. Its details and its solidity make it a high quality toy.

This toy is suitable from birth. It is tested by European (EN71 1.2,3 and 9) and American (ASTM F963) standards. It can be brought to the mouth safely.

It is washable in machine (30°C). It is repairable and made to last, first a rattle, then a toy for the kitchen play.

Its shape is designed to educate baby about Nature, the diversity of fruits & vegetables and healthy food. A cute toy for a green & committed education from the first age.

Its bright colors, and its funny head with large eyes and a mouth that pulls the tongue, make it a facetious and original toy. This is an extraordinary birth gift for an even more special newborn!

Suitable for babies (0+)
taille : 19*8*8 cm
Composition: 100% organic cotton
Maintenance: Machine washable 30 ° C
Certification: EC EN71 1.2,3 and 9 - ASTM F963

*GOTS: Our toys are made from cotton certified GOTS: Global Organic Standard textile. This demanding label certifies not only worthy working conditions but also respect for the environment and certifies a product that does respect the health of those who carry them.

Did you know ? The Jack-O'-Lantern, pumpkins traditionally lit during the Halloween night, were at the origin of the turnips. The turnip tradition comes from an Irish tale and was replaced by the famous orange cucurbit in the 19th century.